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Isaiah 57

Isa 57, Is 57


Isaiah 57

1 The righteous perisheth, and no man layeth it to heart: and merciful men are taken away, none considering that the righteous is taken away from the evil to come.

2 He shall enter into peace: they shall rest in their beds, each one walking in his uprightness.

3 But draw near hither, ye sons of the sorceress, the seed of the adulterer and the whore.

4 Against whom do ye sport yourselves? against whom make ye a wide mouth, and draw out the tongue? are ye not children of transgression, a seed of falsehood.

5 Enflaming yourselves with idols under every green tree, slaying the children in the valleys under the clifts of the rocks?

6 Among the smooth stones of the stream is thy portion; they, they are thy lot: even to them hast thou poured a drink offering, thou hast offered a meat offering. Should I receive comfort in these?

7 Upon a lofty and high mountain hast thou set thy bed: even thither wentest thou up to offer sacrifice.

8 Behind the doors also and the posts hast thou set up thy remembrance: for thou hast discovered thyself to another than me, and art gone up; thou hast enlarged thy bed, and made thee a covenant with them; thou lovedst their bed where thou sawest it.

9 And thou wentest to the king with ointment, and didst increase thy perfumes, and didst send thy messengers far off, and didst debase thyself even unto hell.

10 Thou art wearied in the greatness of thy way; yet saidst thou not, There is no hope: thou hast found the life of thine hand; therefore thou wast not grieved.

11 And of whom hast thou been afraid or feared, that thou hast lied, and hast not remembered me, nor laid it to thy heart? have not I held my peace even of old, and thou fearest me not?



12 I will declare thy righteousness, and thy works; for they shall not profit thee.

13 When thou criest, let thy companies deliver thee; but the wind shall carry them all away; vanity shall take them: but he that putteth his trust in me shall possess the land, and shall inherit my holy mountain;

14 And shall say, Cast ye up, cast ye up, prepare the way, take up the stumblingblock out of the way of my people.

15 For thus saith the high and lofty One that inhabiteth eternity, whose name is Holy; I dwell in the high and holy place, with him also that is of a contrite and humble spirit, to revive the spirit of the humble, and to revive the heart of the contrite ones.

16 For I will not contend for ever, neither will I be always wroth: for the spirit should fail before me, and the souls which I have made.

17 For the iniquity of his covetousness was I wroth, and smote him: I hid me, and was wroth, and he went on frowardly in the way of his heart.

18 I have seen his ways, and will heal him: I will lead him also, and restore comforts unto him and to his mourners.

19 I create the fruit of the lips; Peace, peace to him that is far off, and to him that is near, saith the LORD; and I will heal him.

20 But the wicked are like the troubled sea, when it cannot rest, whose waters cast up mire and dirt.

21 There is no peace, saith my God, to the wicked.

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Summary and the Meaning of Isaiah Chapter 57

The 57th chapter of the Book of Isaiah is a profound exploration of the themes of sin, repentance, and God's merciful nature. It offers a stark portrayal of the moral and spiritual decay that permeated the society of the time, and serves as a warning to future generations about the dire consequences of turning away from God. At the same time, it also emphasizes God's unwavering readiness to forgive and restore those who genuinely repent and turn back to Him.

The chapter begins with a somber depiction of the righteous being taken away, with no one understanding the purpose behind it. This is a reflection of the society's moral and spiritual blindness, which prevents it from recognizing and appreciating righteousness. The righteous are said to be spared from the evil to come, suggesting that their early death is actually a form of divine mercy, shielding them from the impending doom.

The Consequences of Idolatry and Immorality

Isaiah chapter 57 then delves into a scathing critique of the idolatrous and immoral practices of the people. God, through the prophet Isaiah, rebukes the Israelites for their participation in pagan rituals, including child sacrifice, sexual immorality, and idol worship. The imagery used is graphic and disturbing, intended to shock the audience into recognizing the depths of their depravity. These practices are contrasted with the purity and holiness of God, highlighting the stark difference between divine righteousness and human sinfulness.

The people's reliance on idols and foreign alliances for security is condemned as a betrayal of God, who is the true source of protection and provision. This misplaced trust is depicted as a form of spiritual adultery, with the people forsaking their covenant relationship with God in favor of false gods. The people's refusal to repent despite God's repeated warnings is presented as evidence of their hardened hearts and spiritual blindness.

God's Response to Sin and Repentance

Despite the severity of the people's sins, God's response as depicted in Isaiah 57 is not one of unrelenting wrath, but rather of mercy and readiness to forgive. God declares that He will not contend forever or always be angry, signaling His willingness to forgive if the people would only repent. This is a testament to God's boundless mercy and patience, which extends even to the most rebellious and unrepentant sinners.

God's promise to heal the brokenhearted and comfort the contrite further underscores His compassionate nature. This is a powerful reminder that no matter how far one has strayed from God, there is always a way back through sincere repentance. God's readiness to restore the repentant is contrasted with the fate of the wicked, who are said to be like the troubled sea, unable to find peace. This serves as a stark warning about the consequences of persisting in sin and refusing to repent.

The Hope of Redemption

The chapter concludes with a message of hope, assuring the repentant that they will inherit the land and enjoy God's peace. This is a powerful promise of redemption and restoration, signaling God's unwavering commitment to His covenant promises. It assures the reader that despite the severity of their sins, God's mercy and forgiveness are always within reach for those who genuinely repent and turn back to Him.

Isaiah chapter 57 is thus a profound exploration of the themes of sin, repentance, and God's merciful nature. It serves as a stark warning about the dire consequences of turning away from God, while also offering assurance of God's readiness to forgive and restore those who repent. It stands as a timeless testament to God's boundless mercy and patience, and His unwavering commitment to His covenant promises.

Final Thoughts

Isaiah Chapter 57 is a potent blend of admonition and hope. It serves as a stark reminder of the dire consequences of turning away from God, offering a vivid depiction of a society mired in sin and spiritual blindness. At the same time, it also provides a powerful testament to God's boundless mercy and readiness to forgive, assuring the repentant of God's unwavering commitment to His covenant promises.

The chapter's themes of sin, repentance, and divine mercy are as relevant today as they were in the time of Isaiah. They serve as a timeless reminder of the importance of maintaining a right relationship with God, and of the dire consequences of straying from His ways. They also offer hope and assurance to those who have strayed, reminding them of God's readiness to forgive and restore those who genuinely repent and turn back to Him.

In conclusion, Isaiah Chapter 57 is a profound exploration of the human condition, offering a stark depiction of the depths of human sinfulness and the boundless mercy of God. It serves as a timeless reminder of the importance of maintaining a right relationship with God, and of the hope and redemption that are always within reach for those who turn back to Him.



This article is informed by the King James Version of the Holy Bible, the authors' personal knowledge, considerations and experience, and additional materials and resources available in internet.

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